?>

6.02.2011

Jim Joyce Banned from Armando Galarraga Games


Exactly a year after Armando Galarraga was robbed of a perfect game by a Jim Joyce screwup, Major League Baseball has declared a new rule in which the umpire will not be allowed to officiate any of the pitcher's games ever again.

On June 2, 2010, the Detroit Tigers righty was just one out away from making history. However, instead of correctly calling Cleveland Indians' Jason Donald out at first base, Galarraga was forced to get the next out and settle for a complete game shutout. Definitely not as awesome as a perfect game.

After the game, Joyce apologized for getting it wrong and literally almost started bawling over the whole ordeal, tearing up as he handed the lineup card to the pitcher before the following day's contest. It's cool. We'd cry too if we fucked up that big in front of millions of people then had our mistake aired on MLB Network, Sportscenter, newspapers, and every sports blog on the entire internet for like a week straight.

However, it seemed like bygones were finally bygones, since the two authored a book together: Nobody's Perfect: Two Men, One Call, and a Game for Baseball History, released Thursday. And although the game isn't in the history books, everyone knows in their hearts that the poor guy tossed a perfecto. Even General Motors knew it, when they gave him a sweet flippin' corvette the following day.

Either way, Galarraga will never be robbed by Joyce again, and Joyce will never be tempted to treat Gallaraga with favoritism in the future. Especially now since he was traded to the Arizona Diamondbacks this offseason, and ended up sucking his way to a 5.91 ERA before being sent down to the AAA Reno Aces last month. Get well soon, Galarraga!

[Daily Pitch]

2 comments:

Bassmaster said...

We'd cry too if we fucked up that big in front of millions of people then had our mistake aired on MLB Network, Sportscenter, newspapers, and every sports blog on the entire internet for like a week straight.

NO SHIT! The guy went from being a no-name umpire to a household name overnight. And not in a good way.